GLOBAL EXOSKELETON ROBOT MARKET SIZE AT $16.5 MILLION WILL REACH $2.1 BILLION BY 2021

Global Exoskeleton Market Shares, Strategy, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2015 to 2021 are poised to achieve significant growth as the exoskeletons are used inside rehabilitation treatment centers and at home to provide stability for paraplegics and people who need gait training. Ultimately exoskeletons will be used for the rehabilitation of all patients with serious physical injuries or physical dysfunction.

Exoskeleton robots support walking for previously wheel chair bound patients: They function as wearable robots that bring new functionality to the rehabilitation markets. Exoskeleton robots promote upright walking and relearning of lost functions in a patient needing physical therapy. Exoskeletons can play a significant role in this medical treatment process. Emerging markets promise to have dramatic and rapid growth. Exoskeletons deliver higher quality rehabilitation, provide growth strategy for clinical facilities.

Relearning of lost functions in a patient depends on stimulation of desire to conquer the disability. The Exoskeleton can show patients progress and keep the progress occurring, encouraging patients to work on getting healthier. Independent functioning of patients depends on intensity of treatment, task-specific exercises, active initiation of movements and motivation and feedback. Exoskeleton can assist with these tasks in multiple ways. Creating a gaming aspect to the rehabilitation process has brought a significant improvement in systems.

As patients get stronger and more coordinated, a therapist can program the exoskeleton robot to let them bear more weight and move more freely in different directions, walking, kicking a ball, or even lunging to the side to catch one. The robot can follow the patient’s lead as effortlessly as a ballroom dancer, its presence nearly undetectable until it senses the patient starting to drop and quickly stops a fall. In the later stages of physical therapy, the robot can nudge patients off balance to help them learn to recover.

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